Court of Appeals



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Chief Judge Denise Clayton

Denise Clayton

Chief Judge
4th Appellate District
Division 2

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Allison Jones

Chief Judge Pro Tem
6th Appellate District
Division 1

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J. Christopher McNeill

Judge
1st Appellate District
Division 1

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Donna L. Dixon

Judge
1st Appellate District
Division 2

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Jeff S. Taylor

Judge
2nd Appellate District
Division 1

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Kelly Thompson

Judge
2nd Appellate District
Division 2

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Jacqueline M. Caldwell

Judge
3rd Appellate District
Division 1

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James H. Lambert

Judge
3rd Appellate District
Division 2

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Irv Maze

Judge
4th Appellate District
Division 1

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Pamela R. Goodwine

Judge
5th Appellate District
Division 1

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Glenn E. Acree

Judge
5th Appellate District
Division 2

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Joy A. Kramer

Judge
6th Appellate District
Division 2

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Sara Walter Combs

Judge
7th Appellate District
Division 1

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Larry E. Thompson

Judge
7th Appellate District
Division 2

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The Court of Appeals is exactly what its title implies. Nearly all cases come to it on appeal from a lower court. If a case is tried in District or Circuit court, and the losing parties involved are not satisfied with the outcome, they may ask for a higher court to review the correctness of the trial court's decision.

Some cases, like criminal case acquittals and divorces, may not be appealed. In a divorce case, however, child custody and property rights decisions may be appealed. Cases are not retried in the Court of Appeals. Only the record of the original court trial is reviewed, with attorneys presenting the legal issues to the court for a decision.

Fourteen judges, two elected from seven appellate court districts, serve on the Court of Appeals. The judges are divided into panels of three to review and decide cases, with the majority determining the decision. The panels do not sit permanently in one location, but travel about the state to hear cases.